Category Archives: Endangered Birds

Radio Interview with Threatened Species Commissioner of Australia

Radio interview with the Threatened Species Commissioner of Australia,truly a eyeopener.Australia’s current situation should be a warning for every country who has feral cats.

Feralcats cover 99.8% of Australia and have been mauling our marsupials to death. Each feral cat devours at least 1,000 Australian animals per year.  Yesterday I had a yarn with Wendy Harmer from ABC Sydney about the ambitious #ThreatenedSpecies Strategy target I am implementing to cull 2 million #FeralCats by 2020 to save our remarkable Australian animals from #extinction. We are one year into this three year program.  211,000 #FeralCats were culled last year.  And many species trajectories are already turning for the better.  Wendy was appalled to learn of death threats I’ve had from people who love #FeralCats.  While I agree that it is totally not OK to threaten people with violence and death, these threats have personally strengthened my resolve to ramp up our efforts to control #FeralCats.  I’m more committed than ever to supporting Australians who are tackling #FeralCats.  It would be inhumane for us not to act.  Accepting that #FeralCats belong in Australia would be like removing citizenship and choosing #extinction for the bilby, numbat, mala wallaby and another 121 native Australian animals.  Tackling #FeralCats is humane, effective and justifiable.  Thanks Wendy Harmer and our ABC for getting the message out.  Here’s our yarn.  http://www.abc.net.au/radio/sydney/programs/mornings/cat-cull/8285782ABC News 24 ABC News Invasive Species Council PestSmart

Threatened Species commissioner Twitter:

https://mobile.twitter.com/tscommissioner?lang=en

Threatened Species Commissioner Facebook:
https://m.facebook.com/TSCommissioner/?locale2=en_GB
Threatened Species Commissioner Government website:
https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/commissioner

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Importance of Threatened Species Commissioner

​SavingSpecies isn’t easy.  It requires choices like using baiting compounds such as 1080 to eradicate feral predators.  But our animals deserve our support.  And our scientists can show us how to save them safely, effectively and justifiably.  
Today I visited Kapiti Island with DOC Threatened Species Ambassador Nicola Toki.  One of New Zealand’s island arks, Kapiti represents over a decade of hard work by Department of Conservation’s rangers.  The island is now feral predator free.  Baiting with biodegradable 1080 was essential for the eradications.  Now there are no more rats, FeralCats or stoats.  New Zealand’s wildlife is coming back.  The birds and lizards are safe from harm.  Safe from extinction.  The science shows the island has no toxic residues from the biodegradable baiting.  
A bird chorus that almost disappeared from New Zealand has come back.  
Share to show your support for rangers in New Zealand and Australia who are doing their best for our wildlife.  
New Zealand Plant Conservation Network (NZPCN) Forest & Bird Invasive Species Council PestSmart Maggie Barry MP Parks and Recreation Parks Australia Queensland National Parks NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Wellington Zoo New Zealand Ecological Society New Zealand Birds Online BirdLife International BirdLife Australia
Threatened Species commissioner Twitter:
https://mobile.twitter.com/tscommissioner?lang=en
Threatened Species Commissioner Facebook:

https://m.facebook.com/TSCommissioner/?locale2=en_GB

Threatened Species Commissioner Government website:

https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/commissioner

Stop the Bird Killing in the Mediterranean

Please read as there is more in the link.

If you can afford it and if it feels right for you please donate.If not please share as someone else might like to.
‘Exhausted migratory birds are trapped in glue, in agony from thirst and exhaustion. Squeezed to death, tangled in fine nets, millions are massacred this way every year before they can reach their breeding grounds. In an Egyptian market, ducks and orioles with broken wings are carried on a merchant’s back alive before being killed. Countless raptors and other migratory birds such as Turtle Doves await their fate in cages. Many of you will have seen our graphic video of illegal bird killing practices in the Mediterranean (it reached over 3 million people in three days), or you may have been shocked to learn this at last year’s Birdfair.

 

The 2015 Birdfair coincided with the launch of our first ever assessment of the scope and scale of illegal killing of birds in the Mediterranean region. The report, entitled The Killing, estimated that approximately 25 million birds may be illegally killed in the region every year. Twice a year on migration through the Mediterranean, Sociable Lapwing, Red-footed Falcon, Eastern Imperial Eagle and 22 other globally threatened species are running the gauntlet.

 

What has BirdLife International been doing to restore a safe flyway for these migratory birds? Our objective is to end illegal and indiscriminate killing of birds and ensure legal, responsible and sustainable hunting – in areas where hunting does take place. It is a long road ahead, but progress is being made. We’re making a three-pronged attack in the Eastern Mediterranean: reducing the killing of protected species, improving the protection of key sites for migratory birds, and ensuring adequate law enforcement.

 

We can stop this massacre but we need your help. Please donate now to fund our work. If you only wish to keep up with our updates, you may leave us your e-mail address.”
http://www.birdlife.org/africa/news/stopping-bird-killing-mediterranean

Birds to be lost forever


Deforestation, either to meet global demand for timber, or so land can be converted for agricultural use, is one of the biggest threats to bird biodiversity across the world. Over 60% of all bird species worldwide require forest habitats, and BirdLife estimates that figure includes some 76% of globally-threatened bird species.

Read the full article here: 

http://www.birdlife.org/worldwide/news/7-stunning-forest-birds-we-could-soon-lose-forever

I died today

I died today.
I was found by a kind, sweet woman who does wildlife rescue.
I was so sick, I could barely open my eyes.
She took me inside, cradling me in her warm arms, and made me warm and comfortable.
I opened my eyes and looked at her and thanked her for making my last few minutes as comfortable as possible.
But i was too sick to keep fighting anymore.
I had eaten a mouse that was poisoned, and it made me very sick.
I closed my yellow eyes for the last time and went somewhere else.
Please, all I ask is never use poison to kill the mice.
Poison kills owls, like me.
All I wanted was a mouse for dinner.
I died today….

“Stop the use of poison for rats or mice. Live traps are the best to use. Catch and release.
Please.
Save a precious life today, because all life is precious.”

image

It is a heart breaking story isn’t it?
I think everyone who lives in a modern town or city or a modern farm has come accross a mouse or rat problem at some point in their life.
A cat is no good, because it is a non native predator (only native to parts of greece and the middle east) and being far too destructive towards nature as one of the most skilled hunters (it will kill anything-bird chicks in nests are preferred) and endangers the health of its keeper/s, other cats, sea mammals, all other wildlife, dogs and other people who can come in contact in some way or another with her feces. (Because a cat is the only animal which transfers the Occyst of the Taxoplasmosis Gondii parasite -of which we have just begun to grasp the dimensions of infected humans and sea life (which has begun to die due the parasite which gets washed into the ground water with the rain where it reaches the oceans.And free roaming and feral cats on beaches do the rest.) So a cat is a no, no- plus the majority of cats is utterly useless to hunt rats, not to mention that the wildlife price we pay is too high, as mentioned above and which can be researcherd.

Life cage traps for rats, such as sold by a company called ‘Trap man’ are very effective (I have used them myself at a location once and caught a rat every single day for a period of several month.I have to mention that the same area was not only infested with rats but also infested with 17 free roaming cats who’d rather opened the garbage bags or went after birds. )
My neighbor then killed them for me and recycled them in the woods as food for the foxes and badgers. (The trap was always dripping wet and clean when he brought it back. ..)
And for mice who came in the house or settled their home with the rats  in the shed and in the garage I used a good old snap trap and left them in a corner in the garden where foxes or badgers picked them up over night.

Conserving the Worthen’s Sparrow

The Rio Grande Joint Venture recently met with partners in Monterrey, Mexico to develop a draft conservation plan for the Worthen’s Sparrow.

The meeting was led by researchers from the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León and officials from the Comisión Nacional de Areas Naturales Protegidas. It brought together Mexican federal, state, non-profit, and academic partners to provide expert input and assist with the development of the Programa de Acción para la Conservación de la Especie (PACE) for the endemic Worthen’s Sparrow. A PACE is similar to an endangered species recovery plan in the U.S. The overall goal of a PACE is the recovery and conservation of the wild populations of the species and its habitat.

Read more: http://mbjv.org/conserving-worthens-sparrow/

940x350-worthens-sparrow-ricardo-canales

Thanks to pet bird keepers the Yellow Crested Cockatoo is now critically endangered. ..

Says it all doesn’t it?!

As long as pet bird keepers who keep ir want these birds in a cage or aviary in their house to satisfy their selfish ego as long as these birds will run towards extinction.

To keep these birds (unless they are from a rescue center) is unconscious and stupid.To keep them or to want one is living in denial to realize that it is cruel towards the animal but also a crime against nature….

“The yellow-crested cockatoo is now critically endangered. It doesn’t have much time left.

But why are these protected cockatoos coveted?

Apparently these friendly birds make good pets; they are able to imitate human speech and can be trained to learn certain behaviours.”

Read more:

http://indonesiaexpat.biz/other/conservation-other/our-obsession-with-birds-the-sad-words-of-the-yellow-crested-cockatoo/

1.-Yellow-crested-Cockatoo-Sumba-sub-species-Cacatua-sulphurea-citrinocristata.-Photo-by-Burung-Indonesia-e1435224483949